Diapaison
Bach Orchestral Suites: Diapaison d’Or & CD of the Month, 2009
“These suites have a brio and warmth that few versions can rival. Listen with the pleasure of rediscovery and of re-acquainting yourself with a great lady of baroque music.

You can listen to this album in one go – not so frequent in these Suites - , with the pleasure of rediscovery and of meeting again a very large dame baroque music. Monica Huggett blows into her little orchestra [3/3/1/1, 3 oboes, bassoon and harpsichord] a never systematic élan, a healthy virtuosity, a warmth worth all the trumpets and timpanies in the world.”
Diapaison June 2009
Gramophone
Sonatas by JS Bach, Erlebach, G. Böhm, F Schenck ASV ZCGAU107 (DDD)
“Huggett's sound is warm, every note has a real core, and she never sets your teeth on edge.”
Gramophone, January 1987
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“Lyricism and relaxation are not lacking in Monica Huggett's playing in the Bach sonatas, as NA justly found them to be in Ingrid Seifert's with London Baroque (HMV). Concomitantly, since it is directly related to musical approach, Seifert's tone, though widely varied in colour and sonority, is often edgy and harsh, and her bow sometimes bites with uncomfortable aggression. Huggett's sound is warm, every note has a real core, and she never sets your teeth on edge. The lozenging of notes has certainly been taken to over-zealous excess by some baroque performers and there is now some reaction to it; however, before the baby follows the bath water down the plughole, objectors might profitably note its contribution to the supple and expressive nuancing of Huggett's lines—her violin is a veritable 'bowed vox humana'. Equally felicitous are her embellishments, particularly those in the Adagio ma non tanto of BWV1023. She is closely matched by her companions in the very beautiful performances of these 'with-continuo' sonatas.

“The Schmieder bedfellows, BWV1022 and 1024, of uncertain provenance, are included in London Baroque's recording but Trio Sonnerie offer instead four otherwise unrecorded works that give everyone a place in the spotlight: Cunningham allows her gamba to speak naturally, bow lifted from strings, in Schenk's attractive six-movement Suite, whilst Meyerson brings alert style and tasteful flexibility to the five-movement one of Bohm. the other two works are trio sonatas in which the violin and gamba converse, on equal terms. These are superb performances of (some of it totally) neglected music that deserves a place on anyone's baroque shelf, a recommendation that is reinforced by the excellence of the recording per se.”

Gramophone, January 1987

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J.S. Bach: Sonatas and Partitas, BWV1001-06 Virgin Classics CD 545205-2
“With these impressive performances (on her beautiful-toned Amati) of the Solo Sonatas and Partitas Monica Huggett sweeps other baroque interpretations off the board.”
Gramophone, January 1998
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“With these impressive performances (on her beautiful-toned Amati) of the Solo Sonatas and Partitas Monica Huggett sweeps other baroque interpretations off the board. She nails her colours firmly to the mast in her printed introductory note (which follows an uncommonly perceptive and informative commentary on the music by Mark Audus): her aim, she says, is a characteristically bright and sweet seventeenth-century timbre, and she declares herself less interested in the virtuoso aspect of the music, more in the ‘interior spirituality of the sonatas and the gracious elegance of the partitas’. That certainly does not imply any absence of virtuosity: there have been few recordings of these pillars of the repertoire so impeccable in intonation and so free from any tonal roughness.

“Her rhythmic flexibility (very marked in the Chaconne) may upset some traditionalists, but it gives her readings a thoughtfully spontaneous air, and is always applied to clarify the phrasing. The B minor Corrente and D minor Allemande, for example, become more expressive through this subtle phrasing, and her G minor Presto and E major Prelude are not merely mechanically fluent. She is adept at balancing the interplay of internal parts and at preserving continuity of line (as in the D minor Sarabande) and rhythmic flow despite the irruption of chords: only in places in the gigantic C major Fugue did I feel this under strain and at the start of the B minor Bourree lost. There is a lively bounce in her D minor Courante and E major Gigue, and she is splendidly neat in the double of the B minor Courante and in the C major’s finale. For the most part she is very sparing with embellishments, decorating ritornellos of the E major Gavotte and the first half (only) of the D minor Sarabande, but then suddenly becomes lavish in the repeats of the A minor Allegro. Monica Huggett’s musicianly readings are very rewarding and are warmly to be recommended.Monica Huggett talks to Lindsay Kemp on page 16 about what first drew her to the period violin and the trials and tribulations of recording Bach’s masterpiece.”

Gramophone, January 1998

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Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“Monica Huggett plays as to the manor born, with support from a stylish continuo team....I enjoyed these performances immensely”
Gramophone
“Musicianship that is not showy, just highly penetrating and accomplished”
Lindsay Kemp, Gramophone
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“This is the third time in 12 years that a recording of Biber violin sonatas has won this category, a sure sign not only of how the composer’s stock has risen in the last two decades, but also of how his daring, original and often very beautiful music has taken its place at the heart of the Baroque violin repertoire, there to draw great things from the instrument’s finest exponents. Its rehabilitation, indeed, is thanks almost entirely to the period-performance revolution, so it is especially pleasing to see this award go to Monica Huggett, one of Britain’s first Baroque fiddlers and still one of the best. Here she brings to four sonatas from Biber’s 1681 published set, his solo Passacaglia and the motet Nisi Dominus all the rapid-fingered virtuosity they demand, yet weds this to musicianship that is not showy, just highly penetrating and accomplished. What is more, the continuo support from harpsichordist Gary Cooper, theorbo- and guitar-player Elizabeth Kenny and gambist Emilia Benjamin is an outstanding demonstration of the art of semi-improvised accompaniment, constantly alert and sensitive to the music’s numerous changes in direction. It has taken Huggett a surprisingly long time to get round to recording this eloquent and exciting music, but the wait has been worth it.”

Lindsay Kemp, Gramophone

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Dietrich Buxtehude: Trio Sonatas ASV ZCGAU110
“This attractive program was recorded to celebrate Buxtehude's 350th birthday. Though unfamiliar to most modern listeners, Buxtehude's trio sonatas are landmarks in chamber music.”
Gramophone, September 1987
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“Trio Sonnerie have chosen five of the 14 sonatas by Buxtehude from the 1690s to demonstrate their considerable fluency and rapport. These are witty and elegant works, finely crafted and requiring the skills of virtuoso players. Monica Huggett and Sarah Cunningham capture their essence with happily chosen and neatly articulated tempos—the vivace movements are effortlessly played—and beautifully transparent textures. Mitzi Meyerson provides a stylish and secure accompaniment, particularly in the G major Largo and the B flat major Vivace (which is, in fact, a chaconne).

“While Buxtehude's sonatas are written for three instruments, more often than not there are only two independent parts. In the quick movements the viol is as much an ornamenting adjunct to the continuo as a concertante instrument in imitation with the violin. In the Vivace and Allegro of the B flat Sonata and the first Allegros of the D minor and major sonatas the imitation between parts is stunningly executed. The slow movements are predominantly homophonic, decorated with suspensions and chromatic inflections. The success of the Trio's ornamentation in the Largo of the G major Sonata and the rhetorical interplay in the Lento of the G minor is indicative of their collective musicianship.

“The recording balance would generally seem to favour the violin at the expense of the viol (which perhaps would be brighter and less subdued on a CD). Huggett is at her best in the variation movements which show off her imagination as well as her formidable technical resources. Though a less flamboyant player, Cunningham provides a perfect foil; the demands of this fast-moving music mean that the characteristic viol attack is sometimes sacrificed as if the viol were compelled to aspire to the state of a cello. This recording will surely spark off a Buxtehude revival.”

Gramophone, September 1987

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Jean-Marie Leclair: Violin Sonatas ASV ZCGAU106 (DDD) from DCA529 (01/1985)
“Strongly recommended for music, performance and recorded sound.”
Gramophone, January 1987
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“It is, in fact, only a little under two years since I reviewed this LP of violin sonatas by Leclair. Nothing has changed since then, so far as I can see, except the price and the cover which has been changed in order to conform with the series format of ASV's Gaudeamus early and baroque music label. In my original review I remarked on the virtuosity of Monica Huggett and the other members of Trio Sonnerie, who revel in the innumerable subtleties of the repertoire. Slow movements are especially attractive in these performances, faster ones occasionally lacking in vigour though not in any sense deficient in technique or sensibility. This is the finest solo violin music that emerged from a French baroque composer and it rests comfortably alongside that of his most skilled contemporaries. Let us hope that this is the first of many such recitals from Trio Sonnerie—there is virtually no competition at present. In short, strongly recommended for music, performance and recorded sound.”

Gramophone, January 1987

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Rameau: Piéces de clavecin en concerts Virgin Classics CD 561872-2
“[These pieces] have been recorded several times in recent years, but never with the unrivalled warmth and maturity of interpretation that Trio Sonnerie bring to this reading.”
“Beautifully judged performances at mid-price”
Gramophone, August 2001
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“There is a curious common link between the two sets of pieces in this recording: they appear to have been the products of financial expediency. Rameau reworked some of his Pieces de clavecin at a time when he was short of money, and Forqueray’s son Jean-Baptiste adapted some of his father’s Pieces de viole as harpsichord solos at a time when the viol had passed out of fashion, presumably for the same reason – to seek new markets for them. Much as we may regret the circumstances of their genesis, we should be grateful for them. Rameau indicated that either flute or violin was suitable for the leading role and in some recordings both have been used in turn, offering variety of timbre; here there is no flute but, in performances such as these, neither is one conscious of any ‘monochromatism’.

“In terms of order of merit, the choice between Huggett and Mackintosh might as well be settled by tossing a coin as by any other means. Huggett’s is the softer and more subtly nuanced sound and Sonnerie achieve a marvellous unity, three voices within the same body and guided by one single mind, as it were. Differences in tempo between the two are marginal. Though my own preference is (by a short head) for Sonnerie, either would suffice for a lifetime of pleasure.

“There is no other recording of the harpsichord versions of the Suites of Forqueray, but Paolo Pandolfo’s recording of the original Pieces de viole (Glossa GCD920401) enables interesting comparisons to be made. The viol’s lines lie in the lower-middle register, far easier to distinguish in the originals than when everything is transferred to a single instrument, the harpsichord, but Forqueray junior and Mitzi Meyerson have done their work well enough for this not to present a significant problem. His claim to have composed three of the pieces may be true (if so, he mimicked his father’s style with great skill), but no doubt attends Meyerson’s ability to unravel the maze of lines and ornaments, and to make joyous music of it. The unique opportunity to hear this old wine in a slightly less-old bottle tips the scales a little further in favour of the Sonnerie, albeit in a two-disc set, but at a price well worth paying”

Gramophone, August 2001

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Antonio Vivaldi: 12 Trio Sonatas for 2 Violins and Continuo, Op. 1 CPO CD CPO999 511-2
“This is a first-rate release which comfortably outclasses any rival versions of Vivaldi's Op. 1.”
Gramophone, 1999.
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“Vivaldi’s first printed collection, his Op. 1, survives only as the first violin part. There’s more than a nod in the direction of Corelli here, especially in the Folia variations in Op. 1 No. 12.

“Good recordings of Vivaldi’s first printed opus are hard to come by. The set lacks the distinctive imprint of what we understand and recognize as Vivaldian, yet the pieces have great charm if handled sensitively and imaginatively. These have long been virtuous features in Monica Huggett’s playing: her gently inflected approach to the music, shared by the other members of Sonnerie, is a constant pleasure, and is heard to great advantage in the many beguiling slow movements of which the Largo and Sarabanda of Op. 1 No. 4 immediately spring to mind.

“In addition to the Op. 1 Trio Sonatas Sonnerie plays two further trios, a Sonata for two violins, a Sonata for violin, cello and continuo and one of Vivaldi’s nine cello sonatas. One of these, in G minor (RV72) was included in the composer’s Op. 5, containing four solo violin sonatas and two trios. The Cello Sonata (RV43) belongs to a set of six printed in Paris c 1740. These miscellaneous additions to Sonnerie’s programme are in all but one instance more immediately identifiable as products of Vivaldi’s pen than the Op. 1 pieces. The G minor Sonata hints at other of Vivaldi’s chamber works, while the Sonata in F major (RV70) , in its two-violin writing, brings to mind Vivaldi’s double concertos. The writing is essentially unaccompanied but in this performance a discreet plucked string instrument is included.

“The Trio Sonata in C major (RV60) is the least Vivaldian of the appended group and its authenticity was questioned until fairly recently. Yet its spirited Allegro finale seems at times to foreshadow passages in the concertos of L’estro armonico (Op. 3). Alison McGillivray plays the Cello Sonata with a feeling for the music’s declamatory content as well as for its lyrical properties. She ornaments freely but with restraint and her intonation is excellent. The remaining Sonata, for violin and cello (RV83), is a worthy companion piece to the better-known Sonata for treble recorder and bassoon (RV86). Even more than RV70, the supple, virtuoso dialogue for the treble and bass protagonists is concerto-like and is sustained with even balance and expressive sensibility by Huggett and McGillivray. This is a first-rate release which comfortably outclasses any rival versions of Vivaldi’s Op. 1, as well as providing us with a rare opportunity of hearing several other uncommonly encountered pieces. Strongly recommended.”

Gramophone, Sept. 1999

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Handel: Trio Sonatas Op. 2 AV 0033
“...two violinists, who play as if identical twins.”
Gramophone, January 2004
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“These are polished and sophisticated performances, with much exquisitely turned detail, precisely echoed between the two violinists, who play as if identical twins. There is a great deal of subtle timing, graceful shaping and delicately moulded detail, as well as a happy sense of the musical logic... You won’t often hear this music more attentively, more lovingly played.”

Gramophone, January 2004

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Telegraph
Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“This is a disc that merits the attention of anybody who appreciates the highest flights of violin playing, from whatever period.”
“Monica Huggett’s performances do this fine music the fullest possible justice, and are enhanced by the use of a varied selection of continuo instruments, including the gorgeously rich-sounding theorbo.”
The Telegraph, 18th August 2001
Antonio Vivaldi: 12 Trio Sonatas for 2 Violins and Continuo, Op. 1 CPO CD CPO999 511-2
“Italianate grace and fire, with sweet-toned, athletic contributions from violinists Monica Huggett and Emilia Benjamin.”
The Daily Telegraph
BBC
Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“...in the hands of a violinist like Monica Huggett they spring to life.”
BBC Radio 3 - CD Review
Telemann: Paris Quartets Virgin Veritas 61812
“Trio Sonnerie's extremely fluent performances are distinguished by taste and elegance throughout”
BBC Music Magazine
Biber: Mystery Sonatas vol.2 CD GAU 351
“Huggett’s imaginative approach and lively response to detail are among the most rewarding aspects of her version of these emotionally rewarding pieces.”
**** BBC Music Magazine, December 2004
Handel: Trio Sonatas AV 0033
“A thoroughly delightful disc.”
***** BBC Music Magazine, February 2004
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“Huggett and Emilia Benjamin carefully match their tone and phrasing and characterise with real imagination. Underpinned by crisp continuo playing, the Allegros have an exhilarating snap and spirit, while the intensity of the amorous or affecting slow movements will surprise those who think that authentic mean austere. The recorded sound is warm yet aptly intimate. A thoroughly delightful disc.”

***** BBC Music Magazine, February 2004

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The Times
Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“...plays with an easy elegance...”
Sunday Times
Handel: Trio Sonatas AV 0033
“The Trio Sonnerie’s performances are immaculate in style, and infectious in Handel’s exuberant allegros.”
Sunday Times, 11th January 2004
Concert, St John’s Smith Square
“Sonnerie play as one, with a lightness of touch and flexibility that can stop the breath”
The Times, 27th December 2000
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“... Sonnerie play as one, with a lightness of touch and flexibility that can stop the breath... the lilt they put into the closing jig of the sixth Brandenburg was beyond irresistible. They also excel in the interplay and blending of instrumental colour... everyone’s enjoyment was palpable, on stage and off. Rhythmic bounce, precision plus ease: all these qualities made Sonnerie’s Bach superb.”

The Times, 27th December 2000

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International Record Review
Bach Violin Concertos CD GAU 356
“Gaudeamus has given the musicians an immaculately clear recorded sound ... No matter how many versions of the Bach violin concertos you already own, this one is a must.”
Andrew O'Connor, International Record Review, November 2006
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“Over the 20 years since she first recorded Bach's violin concertos with Ton Koopman's Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra, Monica Huggett has returned to these familiar works to a way that is radically different from both her own and everybody else's previous recordings. Her breathtaking virtuosity and audacious embellishment are just the beginning. I seem to recall that Huggett is a motorbike enthusiast and in this recording it is almost as if she and Sonnerie have completely disassembled the works, cleaned up all the parts, replaced and upgraded chose that were worn out, and put the whole thing back together, better than new. This partnership approach between composer and performers is something we take for granted in seventeenth-century music, but when dealing with the music of the great Bach, something, perhaps excessive reverence, holds most performers back from such presumption.

Throughout this disc, I was reminded of the three stunning recordings of Biber that Huggett recently recorded on Gaudeamus (reviewed in November 2001 and October and December 2004). She and her ensemble appear to be approaching Bach as a continuation of the tradition of the great German violin virtuosos. The fast movements are full of ferocious energy and darting ornamental flourishes, from both the orchestra and the soloist. In the middle movements, Huggett eschews the placid stillness that characterizes many performances (sometimes to the point of tedium) for a sense of active repose. For example, over the dreamy pizzicato strings in the famous Adagio of BWV IOS6, augmented by the harpsichord's lute stop, Huggett creates a reverie of sound and melody so rich and beautiful that one can scarcely believe that barely two-and-a-half minutes have passed.

As if all this were not enough, the disc also includes the rarely heard (but probably original) violin version of the great D minor Harpsichord Concerto, in which Huggett's breathtaking facility with Vivaldian bariolage is heard to maximum advantage. Sonnerie have just two ripieno violins, viola and continuo on this recording; but their contribution is certainly not small or reticent, bursting as they are with as much life and energy as their leader.

Gaudeamus has given the musicians an immaculately clear recorded sound and Wiebke Thormählen contributes a booklet essay that usefully explains the somewhat complex history of these works. No matter how many versions of the Bach violin concertos you already own, this one is a must.”

Andrew O'Connor, International Record Review, November 2006

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Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“I certainly hope there's going to be a second volume”
International Record Review
Handel Organ Concertos (Matthew Halls, organ) Avie AV2055
“...cleanly articulated playing, by turns energetic and soulful, which Halls enlivens further through luminous registrations and dynamic ornamentation...very successful.”
International Record Review, June 2005
Biber: Mystery Sonatas vol.1 CD GAU 350
“Monica Huggett is very alive to the essential virtuosity of Biber’s adventurous violin writing... Sonnerie provides music-making which is so unashamedly dazzling, vivid and exuberant...glorious performances.”
International Record Review, October 2004
Biber: Mystery Sonatas vol.2 CD GAU 351
“Spectacular, exuberant, colourful and downright ravishing.”
International Record Review, November 2004
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“Of all the recordings now available of Biber...this [is] by far and away the most spectacular, exuberant, colourful and downright ravishing of them all. Huggett positively revels in the virtuosity of Biber’s original...Huggett’s beautifully crafted performance of the complex and, at times, profoundly moving solo Passacaglia rounds off what is a matchless recording from every perspective.”

International Record Review, November 2004

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Handel: Trio Sonatas AV 0033
“This disc far outshines the competition.”
International Record Review, March 2004
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“Sonnerie’s violins dance nimbly or swoon deliciously in Handel’s rich, graceful melodies. Their attractive tone is both astringent and sweet, luminous and full of shadows... their recorded sound is also impressively lucid... this disc far outshines the competition.”

International Record Review, March 2004

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Other
Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“This is a wonderful CD...a recipe for delight”
Early Music Review
“Huggett is on excellent form..inspired and positively ravishing..”
Early Music Today
Jean-Marie Leclair: Violin Sonatas ASV ZCGAU106 (DDD) from DCA529 (01/1985)
“Leclair's violin has never been so well represented”
Diapason
Telemann: Paris Quartets Virgin Veritas 61812
“a rousingly breathtaking finale”
Classical.Net
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“With the glut of Bach recordings being issued, other composers have remained quite in the shadows this year so it is welcome to review this excellent reissue of Telemann's 'Paris' Quartets, delightfully fresh works full of harmony and invention. Wilbert Hazelzet's flute playing is beyond reproach and he tackles Telemann's occasionally complex figurations and virtuosos passages with ease and aplomb. Each quartet has its own peculiar characteristics and memorable passages but I was greatly enthused by the noble 6th Quartet in E minor where the music takes on an impressively heroic nature. The Second Quartet in E minor is also a charming work with a vivacious middle section and a rousingly breathtaking finale. Sonnerie include such illustrious members as Monica Huggett and Sarah Cunnigham whilst the harpsichord accompaniment is shared between Gary Cooper and Mitzi Meyerson. At the budget Veritas price this album is very much worth acquiring although it is a pity that the extensive notes that accompanied the first issue have now been lost in favour of a rather skimpy and general essay. Recording and presentation are otherwise first class throughout.”

Gerald Fenech, Classical.Net

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Antonio Vivaldi: 12 Trio Sonatas for 2 Violins and Continuo, Op. 1 CPO CD CPO999 511-2
“Melody after melody pours out. The performances are superb. Every bar pulses with life.”
Daily Mail
“Italianate grace and fire, with sweettoned, athletic contributions from violinists Monica Huggett and Emilia Benjamin.”
Daily Telegraph
Handel: Trio Sonatas AV 0033
“The present work is a powerhouse of thematic invention. Sonnerie directed by Monica Huggett play beautifully... This combination of excellent musicianship and the latest scholarship makes this a very attractive set.”
Scottish News, March 2004
“[Sonnerie’s] manifest pleasure in the music is infectious.”
gfhandel.org, February 2004
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“Sonnerie’s vibrant new recording of Opus 2, their debut on the Avie label, has revealed these sonatas afresh. Violinist Monica Huggett is a musician who is both incisive and insightful, and her playing is delightful whether it is animated or reflective. The other members of Sonnerie are comparably skilled at making the music come alive... Sonnerie sound as if they are actually enjoying themselves, and their manifest pleasure in the music is infectious.”

gfhandel.org, February 2004

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“This is playing of real elegance, and nicely recorded too. ”
**** The Independent, 3rd January 2004
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“Monica Huggett and her young players certainly know their way around Handel’s wonderful set of six Trio Sonatas, and that care and attention results in some lovely music-making... this is playing of real elegance, and nicely recorded too. ”

**** The Independent, 3rd January 2004

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“Leading Baroque violinist Monica Huggett and her group Sonnerie perform with dazzling skill the six Trio Sonatas of Handel’s Op. 2... A winner.”
Classic FM Magazine, January 2004
Biber: Mystery Sonatas vol.2 CD GAU 351
“Huggett’s [approach] is ravishing in its sonorities”
The Strad Magazine, November 2004
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“With the tonal sweetness of Huggett’s three violins resonating pleasingly through the many double- and multiple-stoppings and her bowing demonstrating a delicious lightness and freedom, she admirably displays her eloquent command of Biber’s sublime and richly symbolic language. Huggett’s [approach] is ravishing in its sonorities, her supporting cast adding significantly to the exotic sounds of the various scordaturas and the overall effect of her intelligent, stylish and expressive playing.”

The Strad Magazine, November 2004

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Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber: Violin Sonatas, Nisi Dominus, Passacaglia ASV Gaudeamus CDGAU203, 2001
“Monica Huggett’s performances do this fine music the fullest possible justice, and are enhanced by the use of a varied selection of continuo instruments, including the gorgeously rich-sounding theorbo. ”
The Telegraph, 18th August 2001
Concert, National Gallery Dublin
“Monica Huggett’s playing brimmed with the excitement of discovery . . . the dialogue between Huggett and cellist Joseph Crouch had a blend of eloquence and fire that paralleled the flamboyant energy of Baroque buildings”
Irish Times, February 2004
William Lawes: The Royall Consorts ASV GAU CD270
“ASV's recording is as clear as one would expect from this source and Huggett directs with consummate authority all around. For those who relish the prospect of hearkening back to those early days of Queen Elizabeth I, this collection is very representative of that period.”
classical.net, 2003
Mozart: Piano Quartets CD GAU 212
“These performances are an excellent reminder of some of HIP's (historically informed practice) benefits--in this case, laser-like focus and brightly tinted colors. Sonnerie plays a muscular, angular Mozart that throws the composer's ideas into sharp relief.”
Classics Today, 2004